February 09, 2016

Donald Trump has been ahead in the polls for the Republican presidential nomination 

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February 09, 2016

For PR and marketing professionals, every headline condemning a company for questionable practices induces a feeling of dread: "Will I be next?"

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September 17, 2015

 

According to one tweet last night, “the Republican debate has now entered day six.”  It was a long one indeed.  And you have no doubt already seen 8,000 assessments of the winners and losers. 

 

For us, it’s all about the language.  Which lines will shape the narrative going forward.  Which words impact how we view a candidate.  And which are just irresistible.   Fortunately, there was plenty of good language to choose from.  

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In 1980, Americans voted for a new day. 
In 1992, Americans voted for a new direction.
In 2008, Americans voted for hope and change.

In two generations, these are the only 3 times a non-incumbent captured the popular vote.  Once America elected the voice of conservatism, once the voice of moderate pragmatism and once the voice of progressivism.  Their ideologies were wildly different but they all shared one unique trait. 

Despite the fact that they all ran in the midst of Washington dysfunction, economic weakness and challenges overseas, none of their candidacies were defined by these problems.  Instead, each chose to rise above them.    

Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and Barack Obama all campaigned in the language of dreamers.  They painted us a picture of what America could become.  No campaign can ignore our problems, but powerful campaigns don’t make them the centerpiece, either.  From tone to imagery to language, these campaigns made America’s problems a preamble to optimism about the future. 

It’s the one American story that wins most easily in November.  No matter how bad our politics or our economy or our foreign policy seems, Americans choose leaders who see the future as an opportunity and who make us believe that we can be better tomorrow than we ever have been before.  Optimism is king.

Obvious right? 

Enter the GOP primary candidates in 2016.  In analyzing the words and framing used by 7 candidates likely to be stumping in Iowa soon, it wasn't obvious to them.  While all have moments where they try to portray optimism and vision, 6 of the 7 frame their mission in language that has more to do with restoring past greatness than looking forward. 

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February 03, 2015

Michael Maslansky joins Neil Cavuto to discuss Deflategate following the Patriots' fourth Super Bowl win. Michael says that reputation is a fragile thing and that this scandal will follow the Patriots, and the NFL, for a long time.   

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January 15, 2015

Michael Maslansky joined Bill O'Reilly on The O'Reilly Factor to discuss the phenomenon of Google today. Michael and Bill discuss both the influence on our lives it has, as well as how it operates as an often unsourced and privately managed information provider.

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October 30, 2014

Michael Maslansky talks about midterm election predictions on Fox News with Dr. Larry Sabato, director of University of Virginia Center of Politics and Bill O’Reilly. Both guests agreed that Republicans will take the Senate. Maslansky explains that as we approach the election, issues surrounding Obama’s administration are going to move voters toward the GOP. Dr. Sabato brings up the fact that neither Democrats nor Republicans have satisfied U.S.

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October 06, 2014

maslansky + partners CEO Michael Maslansky visits Fox’s The Real Story with Gretchen Carlson to discuss the safety concerns of youth football with former NFL player Chris Valletta and former Navy SEAL and FBI Agent Jonathan Gilliam. They discuss the recent deaths of three high school football players, specifically how concussion awareness and precautionary measures could have prevented these tragedies.

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When the President stood in the Rose Garden today to make a statement about Ukraine, one could presume that he had something to say.  That as Leader of the Free World, he would only take the time to speak to the public with a determined message that the world needed to hear.

 

In preparing for his statement, he and his speechwriters made conscious choices.  Did they want to sound strong or weak?  Definitive or vague?  Active or passive? 

 

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Originally posted on June 21, 2013.

 

As much as Steve Jobs always said he never needed to listen to customers to understand what they wanted, Apple’s communication was always perfectly attuned to the customer.  From “1984” to “Think Different” to the latest iPhone and iPad ads, the focus was always on the user. Ads would inspire them, delight them, engage them. The message was always about the kind of people who purchased Apple products and the things you could do with them.

 

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